Feed on
Posts
Comments

… we celebrate the passing of legitimacy and the rule of law here in America.

Next, every pharmaceutical, hospital and insurance executive in the nation was held out as a prime obstacle to health-care nirvana. And that was their reward for cooperating. When Humana warned customers about cuts to Medicare under “reform,” the White House didn’t bother to complain. They went straight for the gag order. When the insurance industry criticized the Baucus health bill, the response was this week’s bill to strip them of their federal antitrust immunity. (“I want you to find this nancy-boy . . . I want him dead! I want his family dead! I want his house burned to the ground!”)

This summer Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl criticized stimulus dollars. Obama cabinet secretaries sent letters to Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer. One read: “if you prefer to forfeit the money we are making available to the state, as Senator Kyl suggests,” let us know. The Arizona Republic wrote: “Let’s not mince words here: The White House is intent on shutting Kyl up . . . using whatever means necessary.”

What makes these efforts notable is that they are not the lashing out of a frustrated political operation. They are calculated campaigns, designed to create bogeymen, to divide the opposition, to frighten players into compliance. The White House sees a once-in-a-generation opportunity on health care and climate. It is obsessed with winning these near-term battles, and will take no prisoners.

Maybe I should employ the same tactics with my students and colleagues? And here is a little more sugar for the top of your yummy dessert:

Further, the Fed is buying massive amounts of mortgages to depress and distort the mortgage rate. This way of subsidizing bank profits and increasing their capital bails out these institutions but avoids going to Congress for more money to do so. It follows the Fed’s usual practice of protecting big banks instead of the public.

The administration admits to about $1 trillion budget deficits per year, on average, for the next 10 years. That’s clearly an underestimate, because it counts on the projected $200 billion to $300 billion of projected reductions in Medicare spending that will not be realized. And who can believe that the projected increase in state spending for Medicaid can be paid by the states, or that payments to doctors will be reduced by about 25%?

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

Leave a Reply

books on zlibrary official