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Category Archive for 'labor markets'

Borjas strikes back in the next round of paper(s) on the impact of the Mariel Boatlift on American wages.  You would not be shocked to find that he finds that the immigrants were harmful to Floridians: This fundamental error in data construction (wintercow: in the Round Three paper) contaminates the analysis and helps hide the […]

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In the latest paper on the impacts of minimum wage increases on the labor market opportunities for the targeted populations: (wait, before I post the findings, you can obviously dismiss them because I have an agenda, and second, I remind you again that even if the findings below showed the opposite, that says little about […]

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Why We’re Doomed

This one is due to folks on “my side.” You’ll see much written by folks either for or against unions. Fine. Let’s not go there. But what really does a disservice to serious engagement is the need to use a data point to make a larger point that may not warrant it, and to continue […]

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I’d  like my readers and students to briefly examine the economic literature to determine what the “consensus” is on these two questions. What is the economic incidence of the payroll tax and other “benefits” that are mandated to be paid by employers to employees? For example, the total payroll tax amount imposed by the government is 15.3%, […]

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A Good Research Project

A post from Lawrence Mishel of the EPI repeats the very often-cited idea that the typical worker is not doing much better today: The issue of wage stagnation, however, should focus on what the vast majority of workers have been experiencing for most of the post-1979 period. Hourly wages, inflation-adjusted, grew only 0.2 percent annually […]

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This result was surprising, sure to get lots of news coverage: It shows that despite a rise in measured capital-labor ratios, labor-augmenting technical change in the US has been sufficiently rapid that effective capital-labor ratios have actually fallen in the sectors and industries that account for the largest portion of the declining labor share in income since 1980 Paper […]

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Fossil Fuel Friday!

Check out this paper on one of the major challenges facing minorities in poverty: And these are findings for the United States. What do you think the impact of widespread automobile ownership around the world would be not just on employment, but on general levels of satisfaction? Pardon the pun, but your mileage may vary […]

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Via Scott Alexander: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel goes up to the counter and gives a tremendously long custom order in German, specifying exactly how much of each sort of syrup he wants, various espresso shots, cream in exactly the right pattern, and a bunch of toppings, all added in a specific order at a specific […]

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A new paper on the labor market impacts of cap and trade for NOx (a good program, by the way): Who Loses Under Power Plant Cap-and-Trade Programs? by Mark Curtis This paper tests how a major cap-and-trade program, known as the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP), impacted labor markets in the regions where it was implemented.  The […]

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Each month in the United States, about 4.5 million jobs are created and about 4.5 million jobs are destroyed. Or, to put it another way, the amount of “job churn” in our economy amounts to the creation and destruction of about fifty million jobs per year. For reference, the size of the entire labor force is only […]

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