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Category Archive for 'labor markets'

I’m writing final exams and hope to be back at this in due time. In the meantime, here was one particularly interesting working paper I had emailed to me today: Discrimination and the Effects of Drug Testing on Black Employment by Abigail K. Wozniak  -  NBER Working Paper #20095 (LS PE) Nearly half of U.S. employers test job […]

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That would be people like my wife who continue to work. Here is how her income is taxed: Federal tax rate of 28% (her wage puts us in this bracket) State tax rate of 6.5% Social security – her “share is 7.65%, her employer pays 7.65%, but since we know that the incidence of this […]

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I’m Soooooo Exploited

In my inbox today (I have no idea how it even got to me, by the way, as a grad student at Cornell, they UAW tried to unionize me): Hi Michael –  “Being an adjunct can be an isolating experience.  Our schedules alone discourage interaction with one another.  However, stories I’ve heard from fellow contingent […]

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One of the myriad justifications for the passage of the PPACA, and subsequent defenses of going even further (e.g. government paying for all of our health insurance) is that by taking the burden of firms providing health insurance premiums to their workers, it will make firms more internationally competitive. Long ago, we discussed how the […]

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What Protects Workers?

If the populist view of wage determination is true, then we’d see that the only reason firms pay workers more than the bare minimum is to keep workers alive enough to continue exploiting. Further, if that narrative were true, then the only other reason why firms pay more than that amount is because labor market […]

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In a reply to our Mets and Yankees post, a commenter mentioned that poor mental health is (obviously) affiliated with poor labor market outcomes. There is actually a decent literature on this, but here is the most recent paper published on this question:  The Effect of Depression on Labor Market Outcomes by Lizhong Peng, Chad […]

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Here’s a 21st century thought for you … for over a century workers’ unions have fought to shrink the workweek down to 40 (or less). Now, the great labor struggle is to fight to preserve the 40-hour week from the part-timization of the American workforce. By the way, is there any better evidence that labor […]

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Navigating New York City websites has me confused, so I will ask for help, and my question also makes up the point of the post today. In which occupation is there more training required to obtain a “license” to practice? Becoming a hair-stylist in New York City, or becoming a Police Officer in New York […]

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Weekend Ponderance

Isn’t it the case that “employment” is always 100%? What does this indicate about people if you suggest otherwise? Back in the 1600s, when we all worked on farms, would you like to have argued that the “employment rate” in America was zero? And yes, I know that the labor force statistics try to account […]

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Earlier this Spring we examined how one aspect of our tax code (our current debates are like two people fighting over the last egg salad sandwich on the titanic) is anti-family and anti-women. For all of the rhetoric we hear out there about “equal pay for equal work” the idea that you can ever achieve […]

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