Feed on
Posts
Comments

Category Archive for 'labor markets'

A Good Research Project

A post from Lawrence Mishel of the EPI repeats the very often-cited idea that the typical worker is not doing much better today: The issue of wage stagnation, however, should focus on what the vast majority of workers have been experiencing for most of the post-1979 period. Hourly wages, inflation-adjusted, grew only 0.2 percent annually […]

Read Full Post »

This result was surprising, sure to get lots of news coverage: It shows that despite a rise in measured capital-labor ratios, labor-augmenting technical change in the US has been sufficiently rapid that effective capital-labor ratios have actually fallen in the sectors and industries that account for the largest portion of the declining labor share in income since 1980 Paper […]

Read Full Post »

Fossil Fuel Friday!

Check out this paper on one of the major challenges facing minorities in poverty: And these are findings for the United States. What do you think the impact of widespread automobile ownership around the world would be not just on employment, but on general levels of satisfaction? Pardon the pun, but your mileage may vary […]

Read Full Post »

Via Scott Alexander: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel goes up to the counter and gives a tremendously long custom order in German, specifying exactly how much of each sort of syrup he wants, various espresso shots, cream in exactly the right pattern, and a bunch of toppings, all added in a specific order at a specific […]

Read Full Post »

A new paper on the labor market impacts of cap and trade for NOx (a good program, by the way): Who Loses Under Power Plant Cap-and-Trade Programs? by Mark Curtis This paper tests how a major cap-and-trade program, known as the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP), impacted labor markets in the regions where it was implemented.  The […]

Read Full Post »

Each month in the United States, about 4.5 million jobs are created and about 4.5 million jobs are destroyed. Or, to put it another way, the amount of “job churn” in our economy amounts to the creation and destruction of about fifty million jobs per year. For reference, the size of the entire labor force is only […]

Read Full Post »

I’m writing final exams and hope to be back at this in due time. In the meantime, here was one particularly interesting working paper I had emailed to me today: Discrimination and the Effects of Drug Testing on Black Employment by Abigail K. Wozniak  –  NBER Working Paper #20095 (LS PE) Nearly half of U.S. employers test job […]

Read Full Post »

That would be people like my wife who continue to work. Here is how her income is taxed: Federal tax rate of 28% (her wage puts us in this bracket) State tax rate of 6.5% Social security – her “share is 7.65%, her employer pays 7.65%, but since we know that the incidence of this […]

Read Full Post »

I’m Soooooo Exploited

In my inbox today (I have no idea how it even got to me, by the way, as a grad student at Cornell, they UAW tried to unionize me): Hi Michael —  “Being an adjunct can be an isolating experience.  Our schedules alone discourage interaction with one another.  However, stories I’ve heard from fellow contingent […]

Read Full Post »

One of the myriad justifications for the passage of the PPACA, and subsequent defenses of going even further (e.g. government paying for all of our health insurance) is that by taking the burden of firms providing health insurance premiums to their workers, it will make firms more internationally competitive. Long ago, we discussed how the […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »