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Category Archive for 'Central Planning'

Here is a good summary of the modern challenges facing philanthropists. Back when we had our student group this would have been a great topic for discussion. Aside from the obvious Hayekian concerns about knowledge and planning, the philosophical question of whether unborn future people can and should have a claim on us is difficult. […]

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French Press

The French just passed legislation requiring all commercial buildings to install solar panels or install plants on their roofs. I am sure that the following questions were asked and smartly debated before passage: What externality is this solving that could not be done more cheaply with taxes or other output regulatory standards? For example, if […]

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My former professor from graduate school is coming to U of R tomorrow: Speaker to Address Carbon Emission Reduction “Robert Frank, the H.J. Louis Professor of Management and professor of economics at Cornell, will present “Reducing Carbon Emissions Will Be Easier Than Many People Think” at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 7, in Morey Hall, Room […]

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Just finished doing my taxes. Yay, that’s both enjoyable and an incredibly valuable use of my time. I spent only about three hours so far this year getting my paperwork together, shopping for low-priced software, asking for advice, filling out my taxes, making a couple of phone calls and adjusting my withholdings for next year […]

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Allow me to ask a sort of stupid (series of?) question: (1) What does the peer-reviewed science conclude about the safety of vaccines? (2) What does the peer-reviewed science conclude about the efficacy of vaccines in preventing disease? OK. (3) What does the peer-reviewed science conclude about the safety of GMO foods? (4) What does the […]

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Arnold Kling finishes a preamble to a review of a popular book in Political Science: Instead, I think this reflects the ease with which someone on the left can obtain high status in academia, and the corresponding difficulty for those on the right. If you’re on the right, you have to demonstrate awareness of important […]

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The inevitable has become reality: New York State has banned fracking. Makes this sort of thing rather laughable, now doesn’t it? What can I really say? The epidemiology is not there to support “fracking” as being particularly dangerous. The environmental research is not there to support the idea that it is particularly harmful. Remember, good […]

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An article has been making the rounds recently about scientists at Harvard being fairly certain that aerosolic geoengineering approaches would be able to reduce the GHG effect by 50% or more, and in fact do so in a way that not only cools the planet, but does so in a way to ensure that we […]

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This is a theme that we will come back to from time to time. Let’s think for a minute about what Daniel Kahneman says about making good investment decisions: “You should talk to people who disagree with you and you should talk to people who are not in the same emotional situation you are,” (via Marginal […]

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“It” being a really expensive price for a pill that is quite literally a life-saving pill. And once again, we get the usual standard fare from the Voxers: In Europe, things are like, so, way, cooler and more just. They pay, like, so much less for their life-saving pills. Big pharma profits are like, waaaaaayyyyy, […]

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